Topic: Regulations — California and Federal

Overview

Regulations — California and Federal

In general, regulations are rules or laws designed to control or govern conduct. Specifically, water quality regulations under the federal and state Clean Water Act “protect the public health or welfare, enhance the quality of water and serve the purposes of the Act.”

Aquafornia news Chico Enterprise-Record

Oroville hit hard by new water conservation targets

New water conservation targets released by the state Saturday hit Oroville hard, while other north state water agencies saw limited changes.

Aquafornia news Los Angeles Times

What you need to know about the state’s proposed water restrictions

The state water board has modified its proposed conservation regulations  in an attempt to incorporate feedback from urban water suppliers, interest groups and members of the public who had roundly criticized its framework.

Aquafornia news Los Angeles Times

Monday’s Top of the Scroll: State water board issues revised drought regulations for Californians

In response to numerous complaints, state regulators Saturday issued a revised plan for California’s first-ever mandatory water cuts, emphasizing the need for urgent action as summer looms.

Aquafornia news Los Angeles Times

Wednesday’s Top of the Scroll: State water regulator flexes new muscle in response to drought

Long considered timid and politically weak, the [State Water Resources Control] board is flexing new muscle in response to a dry spell that threatens to be the worst in modern California history. … On Friday, the board is scheduled to issue unprecedented new regulations to require urban Californians to use 25% less water.

Aquafornia news Best Best & Krieger LLP (BB&K)

Legal Commentary: Proposed framework for mandatory water use reductions in California released

The State Water Resources Control Board late Tuesday issued the draft framework for forthcoming emergency regulations designed to help the state conserve water in the face of severe drought. … Draft emergency regulations will be released April 17. Adoption is scheduled for May 5 or May 6.

Aquafornia news Best Best & Krieger LLP (BB&K)

Legal Commentary: New federal fracking rules

The U.S. Department of the Interior’s Bureau of Land Management recently released a final rule to provide new oversight over hydraulic fracturing (commonly referred to as “fracking”) on federal and tribal lands. Existing federal regulations, which include a permit requirement for fracking activities, will remain in place.

Aquafornia news NPR

In California’s fourth year of drought, new regulations and $1 billion in relief (with audio)

NPR’s Kelly McEvers speaks with KPCC reporter Molly Peterson on how effective California’s new water restrictions will be in the midst of the state’s historic drought.

Aquafornia news Circle of Blue

Blog: U.S. Clean Water Rule quandary begins on land

In March 2014, two United States agencies charged with stemming pollution in the nation’s waters proposed a 2-page rule change in federal clean water regulations, a change based on more than 1,000 scientific studies, that was meant to clear up years of legal muddiness in defining which small streams and wetlands fell under government regulation.

Aquafornia news Associated Press

Wednesday’s Top of the Scroll: California drought cutbacks may include water at restaurants

The [State Water Resources Control] board last summer imposed emergency regulations prohibiting Californians from washing their cars with hoses that don’t shut off and limiting how often they can water their lawns. Board members on Tuesday appeared ready to extend those rules and add new ones.

Aquafornia news The Sacramento Bee

Commentary: Judge fracking on science, not hype

Rather than allowing activist-generated hype to cloud the discussion (“It’s time for California to end risky fracking,” Viewpoints, Feb. 4), Gov. Jerry Brown and the Legislature focused on the expertise of scientists and approved the nation’s toughest regulations for fracking while allowing it to continue, as it has routinely since the 1950s.

Aquafornia news McClatchy Washington, D.C., Bureau

Thursday’s Top of the Scroll: GOP lawmakers push EPA to rethink clean water rule

In a year the Republican-controlled Congress is expected to take a significant whack at President Barack Obama’s environmental agenda, GOP lawmakers on Wednesday told top environmental officials they should scrap what was once a fairly obscure proposal to define what is and isn’t considered a body of water by federal law.

Aquafornia news KPCC Southern California Public Radio

Where is California water use decreasing?

Regulations passed by the State Water Resources Control Board last year required urban water suppliers to set mandatory conservation rules in their communities – and required those suppliers to report consumption data, to help illustrate how well the rules are working.

Aquafornia news San Francisco Chronicle

State considers tighter water limits, hopes for relief this week

On Tuesday, the State Water Resources Control Board is scheduled to discuss whether to go beyond the current statewide prohibitions on hosing down driveways and overwatering lawns, and enact additional limits on outdoor water use such as regulating times for sprinklers.

Aquafornia news Stockton Record

Commentary: Meetings to understand new water regulations

The San Joaquin County and Delta Water Quality Coalition has developed an extensive program for water quality in our region. … Last March the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board approved the waste discharge requirements for the irrigated lands here in the San Joaquin and Delta area.

Aquafornia news The Desert Sun

Agency to invest in treating water for chromium-6

The Coachella Valley Water District is about to embark on its costliest infrastructure project ever, designing water treatment plants to remove a potentially hazardous heavy metal from the water supply in places from Rancho Mirage to Thermal. … The water district, like many others across the state, is taking steps to comply with a new safe drinking water limit for chromium-6 set by the California Department of Public Health.

Aquafornia news Ventura County Star

California strives to take lead in overseeing fracking

Final regulations are now in place to establish what will become the most comprehensive state oversight of hydraulic fracturing in the nation, but two key parts of California’s landmark 2013 law remain unfinished.

Aquafornia news Best Best & Krieger LLP

Announcement: California Department of Fish and Wildlife increases CEQA document filing fees

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife will increase its filing fees for all CEQA Notices of Determination filed on or after Jan. 1. 

Aquafornia news The Sacramento Bee

Blog: California crafts groundwater monitoring rules for fracking sites

Despite the controversy, the state is working to develop regulations for fracking, in which pressurized chemicals and water are injected underground to dislodge gas trapped in rock formations. … The State Water Resources Control Board hosts a public workshop to discuss how and when sampling of groundwater will be conducted, 8:30 a.m. at the Cal/EPA Building on I Street.

Aquafornia news State Water Resources Control Board

Announcement: Stakeholder meetings to develop model groundwater monitoring criteria in areas of oil and gas production

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is hosting a public meeting regarding the development of model criteria for groundwater monitoring related to oil and gas well stimulation treatments, as specified in Senate Bill 4 (Pavley, Statutes of 2013).  LLNL is the expert that the State Water Resources Control Board (State Water Board) is working with to develop the model criteria for groundwater monitoring. The meeting will be held at the Cal/EPA Building in Sacramento on December 11th, 2014, from 8:30 am to 5 pm.

Aquafornia news The Sacramento Bee

Commentary: Let water flow in bathroom faucets

The California Energy Commission will make a crucial mistake if it ignores a potential threat to the health and safety of Californians in favor of a proposal from investor-owned utilities.

Aquafornia news UC Davis Center for Watershed Sciences California WaterBlog

Blog: Flagging problem dams for fish survival

This drought year, as in those past, California water regulators have given away to cities and farms some river flows critical to fish and wildlife. … There are, however, legal backstops to prevent harmful reductions in fish flows, even during a drought as severe as this one.

Aquafornia news The Sacramento Bee

Editorial: It’s time to get extremely serious about conserving water

The message that California is in severe drought is being heard. But more must be done.

Aquafornia news The New York Times

The risks of cheap water

This summer, California’s water authority declared that wasting water — hosing a sidewalk, for example — was a crime. Next door, in Nevada, Las Vegas has paid out $200 million over the last decade for homes and businesses to pull out their lawns.

Aquafornia news Capital Public Radio

State of California makes changes to fracking regulations

This is the third version of the regulations for fracking, which injects sand, water and chemicals underground to release oil.

Aquafornia news Los Angeles Times

Californians make big cuts in water usage, report says

Some of the biggest savings have come in Southern California, which faced criticism earlier this year for increasing water use at a time when the rest of the state was cutting back, according to state records released Tuesday.

Aquafornia news Riverside Press-Enterprise

Water use declines thanks to rebates, mandatory restrictions

Water use was down across most of the Inland area in August compared to the same period last year, contributing to a statewide 11.5 percent drop for the month, officials said Tuesday.

Aquafornia news Stockton Record

Water use continues to decline — but by how much?

When Tracy city workers first ran the numbers suggesting that residents saved 41 percent more water in August than they did the previous year — one of the highest conservation rates in the state — Steve Bayley was stunned.

Aquafornia news San Francisco Chronicle

Big water cuts by many Northern Californians

As California braces for a rainy season that may again be a bust, residents are becoming increasingly mindful about water conservation, particularly in the northern half of the state.

Aquapedia background

Salton Sea

Salton Sea

As part of the historic Colorado River Delta, the Salton Sea regularly filled and dried for thousands of years due to its elevation of 232 feet below sea level.

The most recent version of the Salton Sea was formed in 1905 when the Colorado River broke through a series of dikes and flooded the seabed for two years, creating California’s largest inland body of water. The Salton Sea, which is saltier than the Pacific Ocean, includes 130 miles of shoreline and is larger than Lake Tahoe

Aquapedia background

Safe Drinking Water Act

Safe Drinking Water Act

The federal Safe Drinking Water Act sets standards for drinking water quality in the United States.

Launched in 1974 and administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Safe Drinking Water Act oversees states, communities, and water suppliers who implement the drinking water standards at the local level.

The act’s regulations apply to every public water system in the United States but do not include private wells serving less than 25 people.

According to the EPA, there are more than 160,000 public water systems in the United States.

Western Water Magazine

Changing the Status Quo: The 2009 Water Package
January/February 2010

This printed issue of Western Water looks at some of the pieces of the 2009 water legislation, including the Delta Stewardship Council, the new requirements for groundwater monitoring and the proposed water bond.

Western Water Magazine

Water Policy 2007: The View from Washington and Sacramento
March/April 2007

This issue of Western Water looks at the political landscape in Washington, D.C., and Sacramento as it relates to water issues in 2007. Several issues are under consideration, including the means to deal with impending climate change, the fate of the San Joaquin River, the prospects for new surface storage in California and the Delta.

Western Water Magazine

Thirty Years of the Clean Water Act:
November/December 2002

2002 marks the 30th anniversary of one of the most significant environmental laws in American history, the Clean Water Act (CWA). The CWA has had remarkable success, reversing years of neglect and outright abuse of the nation’s waters. But challenges remain as attention turns to the thorny issue of cleaning up nonpoint sources of pollution.

Western Water Magazine

Pervasive and Persistent: Constituents of Growing Concern
January/February 2011

This printed issue of Western Water, based on presentations at the November 3-4, 2010 Water Quality Conference in Ontario, Calif., looks at constituents of emerging concerns (CECs) – what is known, what is yet to be determined and the potential regulatory impacts on drinking water quality.

Western Water Magazine

Mimicking the Natural Landscape: Low Impact Development and Stormwater Capture
September/October 2011

This printed issue of Western Water discusses low impact development and stormwater capture – two areas of emerging interest that are viewed as important components of California’s future water supply and management scenario.

Western Water Magazine

How Much Water Does the Delta Need?
July/August 2012

This printed issue of Western Water examines the issues associated with the State Water Board’s proposed revision of the water quality Bay-Delta Plan, most notably the question of whether additional flows are needed for the system, and how they might be provided.

Western Water Magazine

Hydraulic Fracturing and Water Quality: A Cause for Concern?
September/October 2012

This printed issue of Western Water looks at hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking,” in California. Much of the information in the article was presented at a conference hosted by the Groundwater Resources Association of California.

Western Water Magazine

A Call to Action? The Colorado River Basin Supply and Demand Study
November/December 2012

This printed issue of Western Water examines the Colorado River Basin Water Supply and Demand Study and what its finding might mean for the future of the lifeblood of the Southwest.

Western Water Magazine

Viewing Water with a Wide Angle Lens: A Roundtable Discussion
January/February 2013

This printed issue of Western Water features a roundtable discussion with Anthony Saracino, a water resources consultant; Martha Davis, executive manager of policy development with the Inland Empire Utilities Agency and senior policy advisor to the Delta Stewardship Council; Stuart Leavenworth, editorial page editor of The Sacramento Bee and Ellen Hanak, co-director of research and senior fellow at the Public Policy Institute of California.

Western Water Magazine

Nitrate and the Struggle for Clean Drinking Water
March/April 2013

This printed issue of Western Water discusses the problems of nitrate-contaminated water in small disadvantaged communities and possible solutions.

Western Water Magazine

Meeting the Co-equal Goals? The Bay Delta Conservation Plan
May/June 2013

This issue of Western Water looks at the BDCP and the Coalition to Support Delta Projects, issues that are aimed at improving the health and safety of the Delta while solidifying California’s long-term water supply reliability.

Western Water Magazine

Two States, One Lake: Keeping Lake Tahoe Blue
September/October 2013

This printed issue of Western Water discusses some of the issues associated with the effort to preserve and restore the clarity of Lake Tahoe.

Western Water Magazine

Overdrawn at the Bank: Managing California’s Groundwater
January/February 2014

This printed issue of Western Water looks at California groundwater and whether its sustainability can be assured by local, regional and state management. For more background information on groundwater please refer to the Founda­tion’s Layperson’s Guide to Groundwater.

Video

The Klamath Basin: A Restoration for the Ages (20 min. DVD)

20-minute version of the 2012 documentary The Klamath Basin: A Restoration for the Ages. This DVD is ideal for showing at community forums and speaking engagements to help the public understand the complex issues related to complex water management disputes in the Klamath River Basin. Narrated by actress Frances Fisher.

Video

The Klamath Basin: A Restoration for the Ages (60 min. DVD)

For over a century, the Klamath River Basin along the Oregon and California border has faced complex water management disputes. As relayed in this 2012, 60-minute public television documentary narrated by actress Frances Fisher, the water interests range from the Tribes near the river, to energy producer PacifiCorp, farmers, municipalities, commercial fishermen, environmentalists – all bearing legitimate arguments for how to manage the water. After years of fighting, a groundbreaking compromise may soon settle the battles with two epic agreements that hold the promise of peace and fish for the watershed. View an excerpt from the documentary here.

Publication

Layperson’s Guide to Water Recycling
Updated 2013

As the state’s population continues to grow and traditional water supplies grow tighter, there is increased interest in reusing treated wastewater for a variety of activities, including irrigation of crops, parks and golf courses, groundwater recharge and industrial uses.

Publication

Layperson’s Guide to California Water
Updated 2015

The 24-page Layperson’s Guide to California Water provides an excellent overview of the history of water development and use in California. It includes sections on flood management; the state, federal and Colorado River delivery systems; Delta issues; water rights; environmental issues; water quality; and options for stretching the water supply such as water marketing and conjunctive use.

Publication

Layperson’s Guide to the Central Valley Project
Updated 2011

The 24-page Layperson’s Guide to the Central Valley Project explores the history and development of the federal Central Valley Project (CVP), California’s largest surface water delivery system. In addition to the history of the project, the guide describes the various CVP facilities, CVP operations, the benefits the CVP brought to the state, and the CVP Improvement Act (CVPIA).

Publication

Layperson’s Guide to the Delta
Updated 2010

The 24-page Layperson’s Guide to the Delta explores the competing uses and demands on California’s Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta. Included in the guide are sections on the history of the Delta, its role in the state’s water system, and its many complex and competing issues with sections on water quality, levees, salinity and agricultural drainage, and water distribution.

Publication

Layperson’s Guide to Water Rights Law
Updated 2013

The 28-page Layperson’s Guide to Water Rights Law, recognized as the most thorough explanation of California water rights law available to non-lawyers, traces the authority for water flowing in a stream or reservoir, from a faucet or into an irrigation ditch through the complex web of California water rights.

Video

Shaping of the West: 100 Years of Reclamation

30-minute DVD that traces the history of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and its role in the development of the West. Includes extensive historic footage of farming and the construction of dams and other water projects, and discusses historic and modern day issues.

Video

Water on the Edge (30-minute VHS)

A 30-minute version of the 2005 PBS documentary Water on the Edge. This video is ideal for showing at community forums and speaking engagements to help the public understand the complex issues surrounding the New River.

Video

Water on the Edge (60-minute VHS)

Water truly has shaped California into the great state it is today. And if it is water that made California great, it’s the fight over – and with – water that also makes it so critically important. In efforts to remap California’s circulatory system, there have been some critical events that had a profound impact on California’s water history. These turning points not only forced a re-evaluation of water, but continue to impact the lives of every Californian. This 2005 PBS documentary offers a historical and current look at the major water issues that shaped the state we know today. Includes a 12-page viewer’s guide with background information, historic timeline and a teacher’s lesson.

Video

Water on the Edge (60-minute DVD)

Water truly has shaped California into the great state it is today. And if it is water that made California great, it’s the fight over – and with – water that also makes it so critically important. In efforts to remap California’s circulatory system, there have been some critical events that had a profound impact on California’s water history. These turning points not only forced a re-evaluation of water, but continue to impact the lives of every Californian. This 2005 PBS documentary offers a historical and current look at the major water issues that shaped the state we know today. Includes a 12-page viewer’s guide with background information, historic timeline and a teacher’s lesson.

Video

California Water Recycling

In the West, it is not a matter of if a drought will occur, but when. In an effort to develop a drought-proof water supply, many communities are turning to water recycling. Water recycling is reusing treated wastewater for irrigating golf courses, other urban landscapes, some crops, wetlands enhancement, industrial processes and even groundwater recharge. But many people do not understand how water is treated, recycled and reused, causing some to oppose new projects.

Maps & Posters

Klamath River Watershed Map
Published 2011

This beautiful 24×36 inch poster, suitable for framing, displays the rivers, lakes and reservoirs, irrigated farmland, urban areas and Indian reservations within the Klamath River Watershed. The map text explains the many issues facing this vast, 15,000-square-mile watershed, including fish restoration; agricultural water use; and wetlands. Also included are descriptions of the separate, but linked, Klamath Basin Restoration Agreement and the Klamath Hydroelectric Agreement, and the next steps associated with those agreements. Development of the map was funded by a grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Maps & Posters

Carson River Basin Map
Published 2006

A companion to the Truckee River Basin Map poster, this 24×36 inch poster, suitable for framing, explores the Carson River, and its link to the Truckee River. The map includes Lahontan Dam and Reservoir, the Carson Sink, and the farming areas in the basin. Map text discusses the region’s hydrology and geography, the Newlands Project, land and water use within the basin and wetlands. Development of the map was funded by a grant from the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Mid-Pacific Region, Lahontan Basin Area Office.

Maps & Posters

Delta Sustainability Map
Published 2006

This beautifully illustrated 24×36 inch poster, suitable for framing and display in any office or classroom, focuses on the theme of Delta sustainability.

The text, photos and graphics explain issues related to land subsidence, levees and flooding, urbanization and fish and wildlife protection. An inset map illustrates the tidal action that increases the salinity of the Delta’s waterways. Development of the map was funded by a grant from the California Bay-Delta Authority.

Maps & Posters

Invasive Species Poster Set

One copy of the Space Invaders and one copy of the Unwelcome Visitors poster for a special price.

Maps & Posters

Unwelcome Visitors

This 24×36 inch poster, suitable for framing, explains how non-native invasive animals can alter the natural ecosystem, leading to the demise of native animals. “Unwelcome Visitors” features photos and information on four such species – including the zerbra mussel – and explains the environmental and economic threats posed by these species.

Maps & Posters

Space Invaders

This 24×36 inch poster, suitable for framing, explains how non-native invasive plants can alter the natural ecosystem, leading to the demise of native plants and animals. “Space Invaders” features photos and information on six non-native plants that have caused widespread problems in the Bay-Delta Estuary and elsewhere.

Commands