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Last Chance to Register for Thursday’s Water Summit; Join Online Q&A for 2022 Water Leader Apps; Journey into the Central Valley and Headwaters

As we wind down 2021 at the Water Education Foundation, we are hosting a few more educational events and fun virtual journeys to boost your water knowledge.

Water Summit, Oct. 28:

Aerial photo of a portion of Lake Oroville in July 2021 showing almost no water, the result of a two-year drought.Despite the deluge of rain sparked by an atmospheric river in Northern California this week, the state is still gripped by an unprecedented drought.

Karla Nemeth, director of the California Department of Water Resources, and others will discuss how the drought has impacted wildlife, farms, cities and more at our Water Summit on Thursday, and explore what longer-term projects and partnerships are aiming to make the state more drought resilient.

Click here to find out more and register for Thursday’s Water Summit virtual forum and the optional in-person reception cruise aboard an open-air yacht on the Sacramento River. Foundation members get discounted prices to attend.

Announcement

Support Water Education in California Through Workplace Giving
Foundation is now part of federal, state and private programs allowing donations through payroll deductions

It’s workplace giving season, the time of year when anyone in the workplace can show their support for the organizations and causes they love.

All state, federal and private workplace giving programs are now open, allowing donations through payroll deductions.

Water News You Need to Know

Aquafornia news San Francisco Chronicle

Wednesday Top of the Scroll: Charts show where California reservoir totals stand after the atmospheric river

This weekend’s atmospheric river brought record-breaking amounts of rain to drought-plagued California. But they didn’t give the state’s water supply much of a boost, data shows. The state Department of Water Resources compared the amount of water in select reservoirs across the state as of midnight Oct. 25 to the capacity of each reservoir and to historic levels for the same date. The data shows that, even after all of Sunday and Monday’s rainfall, many of California’s largest reservoirs are still holding less water than the historic level for this time of year.

Related articles: 

Aquafornia news CapRadio

Sacramento went from record drought to record rain. Climate change may make that more common

California has always been a state known for its weather variability. There have been other instances of intense precipitation, like the heavy rainfall in 2017 that led to the Oroville dam crisis.  But [UCLA climate scientist Daniel] Swain said that particularly intense precipitation during periods of dryness are expected to become the norm due to climate change. 

Related articles: 

Aquafornia news CBS Sacramento

Climate insurance? California Department of Insurance releases report to re-imagine insurance

With so many extremes hitting California, the state is now talking about Climate Insurance. The next disaster – combined with a lack of insurance that many can’t afford and is getting even more expensive – has the state considering a new community-based approach to lower risk, and make sure more people are protected against catastrophic weather events. … Ideas to lower risk include building wetlands to store water in floods, creating statewide hazard maps so residents are clear on the risks where they live, and naming heatwaves like hurricanes so people properly prepare.

Related articles: 

Aquafornia news Water Education Foundation

Announcement: Last chance to register for Thursday’s Water Summit; join online Q&A for 2022 Water Leader apps; journey into the Central Valley and headwaters

Despite the deluge of rain sparked by an atmospheric river in Northern California this week, the state is still gripped by an unprecedented drought. Karla Nemeth, director of the California Department of Water Resources, and others will discuss how the drought has impacted wildlife, farms, cities and more at our Water Summit on Thursday, and explore what longer-term projects and partnerships are aiming to make the state more drought-resilient.

Online Water Encyclopedia

Restored wetlands in Northern California
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Wetlands

Wetlands are among the most important and hardest-working ecosystems in the world, rivaling rain forests and coral reefs in productivity of life. 

Salton Sea
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Salton Sea

As part of the historic Colorado River Delta, the Salton Sea regularly filled and dried for thousands of years due to its elevation of 237 feet below sea level.

The most recent version of the Salton Sea was formed in 1905 when the Colorado River broke through a series of dikes and flooded the seabed for two years, creating California’s largest inland body of water. The Salton Sea, which is saltier than the Pacific Ocean, includes 130 miles of shoreline and is larger than Lake Tahoe

Lake Oroville shows the effects of drought in 2014.

Drought

Drought—an extended period of limited or no precipitation—is a fact of life in California and the West, with water resources following boom-and-bust patterns. During California’s 2012–2016 drought, much of the state experienced severe drought conditions: significantly less precipitation and snowpack, reduced streamflow and higher temperatures. Those same conditions reappeared early in 2021 prompting Gov. Gavin Newsom in May to declare drought emergencies in watersheds across 41 counties in California.

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Important People in California Water History

Read about the history people who played a significant role in the water history of California.