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Overview

Aquafornia
Water news you need to know

A collection of top water news from around California and the West compiled each weekday by veteran journalist Matt Weiser.

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Please Note: The headlines below are the original headlines used in the publication cited at the time they are posted here, and do not reflect the stance of the Water Education Foundation, an impartial nonprofit that remains neutral.

Aquafornia news San Jose Mercury News

Wednesday Top of the Scroll: EBMUD warns customers they’ll need to cut water use during fire-prevention power outages

If PG&E has to shut off power in the East Bay to prevent wildfires from igniting and burning homes, residents will be strongly urged to severely reduce their water use during the emergency. That’s because their main water supplier, the East Bay Municipal Utility District, may have its power cut off, too, and be forced to rely on 29 emergency backup generators.

Aquafornia news Chico Enterprise-Record

Service lines with contaminated water are getting replaced

State and local officials believe benzene contamination in the water systems in areas burned by the Camp Fire is limited to isolated pockets after ongoing testing, they said at a community meeting on Monday. … A no-drink advisory in the Paradise Irrigation District will be lifted at each location as testing confirms no unsafe levels of the chemicals in the service lines.

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Aquafornia news The Desert Review

IID votes to lower conserved water payments to farmers

Initially, farmers had been contracted $285 per acre/feet for conserved water and the IID welcomed all participants. However, due to the farmers’ innovation and ingenuity, the total acre/feet saved the past three years exceeded the amount needed for the QSA transfer.

Aquafornia news Lake County News

DWR releases final California Water Plan Update 2018

Update 2018 presents a vision for greater collaboration and alignment among water sectors and institutions, sound strategies, and long-term investments needed for the sustainable management of the California’s water supply.

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Aquafornia news AgAlert

SGMA sharpens focus on conjunctive use

Requirements to balance supplies in California groundwater basins have refocused attention on how best to achieve recharge, and on what’s known as the conjunctive use of surface and groundwater supplies. Some irrigation districts have been recharging groundwater in that manner for years or even decades.

Aquafornia news Los Angeles Times

L.A. River planners float three design proposals for a major new park

The three design schemes look totally distinct on paper and come with different names — “Island,” “Soft Edge,” “The Yards” — but they all have the same goal: restore wildlife habitat, plant people-friendly landscapes and develop flood-control strategies for a place that has been the subject of so much neglect, speculation, dreaming and debate: the L.A. River.

Aquafornia news The Sun-Gazette

California’s 2019-2020 budget has millions for water projects and healthcare programs

Brokered in large part by rookie state senator for California’s 14 Senate District, Melissa Hurtado, the southern portion of the Valley has gained tens of millions of dollars of investment in drinking water, asthma mitigation, aging and disability resource centers and Valley Fever research.

Aquafornia news GVWire.com

Clovis secures its future growth with FID water deals

The Clovis City Council has approved landmark water deals with the Fresno Irrigation District that officials say will secure the city’s growth for decades to come. According to the Clovis General Plan, the city expects 280,000 residents in 2083 — 2.5 times its 110,000 population. Plans call for Clovis to grow northeast and southeast.

Aquafornia news Patch.com

Grass lawn removal rebate increases in Malibu

The rebate for Malibu residents who remove grass landscaping has been increased from $4 to $5 per square foot of turf removed, the City of Malibu announced Monday. The incentive is part of the Malibu Smart water conservation program offered by the City of Malibu, County of Los Angeles and West Basin Municipal Water District.

Aquafornia news The Conversation

As flood risks increase across the US, it’s time to recognize the limits of levees

River towns can start by restricting floodplain development so that people and property will not be in harm’s way. This will create space for rivers to spill over in flood season, reducing risks downstream. Proposals to raise and improve levees should be required to take climate change and related flooding risks into account.

Aquafornia news California Natural Resources Agency

Video: California Natural Resources Agency Speaker Series: Reactivating Our Floodplains

California Natural Resources Agency Secretary Wade Crowfoot and a diverse panel of experts had a public conversation about efforts to reactivate the floodplains in the Sacramento Valley.

Aquafornia news Planning and Conservation League

News release: Governor’s water portfolio input meetings

The Portfolio Recommendations Group is an ad hoc gathering of leaders from over 80 urban water districts, ag water districts, tribes, environmental justice groups, business groups, environmental groups, flood agencies, fire agencies and watershed groups. All interested parties are invited to join this focused 3-month effort to develop recommendations for Governor Newsom’s Water Resilience Portfolio.

Aquafornia news U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

News release: Reclamation awards $5.1 million in research for new ways to desalinate and treat water

The Bureau of Reclamation announced that 30 projects will receive $5.1 million from the Desalination and Water Purification Research Program to develop improved and inexpensive ways to desalinate and treat impaired water.

Aquafornia news Food Tank

Opinion: Changing agriculture from a GHG emitter to absorber

Agricultural scientists across the globe including at Stanford University and the University of California at Davis have in recent years been making new discoveries showing that healthy soil holds more carbon than previously thought and that good soil management can serve as an important carbon sink.

Aquafornia news California WaterBlog

Blog: Ties between the Delta and groundwater sustainability in California

Groundwater overdraft is a major problem globally and has been a persistent and growing problem in California for decades. This overdraft is predominantly driven by the economic value of water for agricultural production and cities.

Aquafornia news Public Policy Institute of California

Blog: An opportunity to restore fish abundance on the Eel River

The Eel River—once home to the state’s third-largest salmon and steelhead runs, all of which are now listed as threatened―may see the return of healthy fisheries in coming years. A unique opportunity to remove a dam that blocks fish from reaching spawning habitat has arisen. We talked to Curtis Knight, executive director of CalTrout, about the situation.

Aquafornia news Legal Planet

Blog: The Trump administration’s latest efforts to hobble the Clean Water Act

Earlier this year, President Trump launched – by executive order, of course – a new process designed to circumscribe dramatically states’ longstanding authority to review applications for federal permits for any activity that may result in a discharge to a water body within a state’s boundaries. That proposal is fundamentally flawed, both on its merits and in the procedures USEPA is using to implement it.

Aquafornia news San Jose Mercury News

Tuesday Top of the Scroll: California pledges millions to battle enormous swamp rats

A growing menace in the form of 15-pound swamp rodents is threatening Delta waterways, and the state is throwing money, hunting dogs and birth control at the invasive pests which have the potential to destroy crops and wetlands.

Aquafornia news San Francisco Chronicle

Heat waves likely to become longer, more intense — even in Bay Area, study shows

Summers in San Francisco may soon feel more like the warmer East Bay. The East Bay may soon feel more like Sacramento. And Sacramento — well, it might just be too hot to stick around any longer. One of the most detailed studies on rising temperatures suggests that few places in the United States will be unaffected by extreme heat by the middle of this century.

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Aquafornia news The Atlantic

In new climate, California’s wildfires are 500 percent larger

Californians may feel like they’re enduring an epidemic of fire. The past decade has seen half of the state’s 10 largest wildfires and seven of its 10 most destructive fires, including last year’s Camp Fire, the state’s deadliest wildfire ever. A new study, published this week in the journal Earth’s Future, finds that the state’s fire outbreak is real—and that it’s being driven by climate change.

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