Aquafornia

Overview

Aquafornia
Water news you need to know

A collection of top water news from around California and the West compiled each weekday by veteran journalist Matt Weiser.

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Please Note: The headlines below are the original headlines used in the publication cited at the time they are posted here, and do not reflect the stance of the Water Education Foundation, an impartial nonprofit that remains neutral.

Aquafornia news ABC30

CDFW officers bust large marijuana grows that threatened South Valley bird habitat

Amid the vital habitat for wildlife, officers found that the suspects were using pesticides and fertilizers, including a 55-gallon drum of Roundup, and had an open trash pit and water pit used for premixing chemicals.

Related article:

Aquafornia news KALW

The town that refuses to die

When drinking water gets contaminated, there’s usually a polluter to blame. Most likely it’s the fault of big industry spewing out toxic fertilizers or synthetic chemicals. But in nearly 100 communities in California, this isn’t the case. They have water that is contaminated with a naturally occurring chemical: Arsenic. Allensworth, California is one of those communities.

Aquafornia news The San Diego Union-Tribune

DDT contaminants in marine mammals may threaten California condor recovery

The California condor’s dramatic recovery from near-extinction was aided by removal of toxic substances from the land, which accumulated in animals whose carrion they ate. But that recovery may be threatened in coastal condors by DDT-related contaminants in marine mammals, according to a preliminary study led by an San Diego State researcher.

Aquafornia news KCRA TV

Construction is underway at Sacramento’s McKinley Park

Crews are digging and removing 66,000 yards of dirt to make room for an underground vault. It will be used to catch rainwater during a storm in order to alleviate flooding around the park.  Behind the fence, crews are hauling away dirt. Workers will eventually put the 6 million-gallon water vault 22 feet underground.

Aquafornia news E&E News

Lawmakers brawl over PFAS riders

House Democrats are at odds with the White House, Senate Republicans and each other over provisions in defense policy legislation that aim to address toxic chemicals found in drinking water. Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances, known as PFAS … have been linked to thyroid issues, birth defects and other health problems.

Aquafornia news Klamath Falls Herald & News

National relevance of takings case reflected in Monday hearing in D.C.

A longtime court case involving the shutoff of water to multiple water users in the Klamath Basin in 2001 attracted wide-ranging attention from Pacific Northwest-based organizations and those within the legal community in Washington, D.C. Nearly 90 minutes of oral arguments were heard Monday at the U.S. Court of Appeals at the Federal Circuit.

Aquafornia news Arizona Public Media

Arizona senators propose drought bill

A bill sponsored by U.S. Sens. Martha McSally and Kyrsten Sinema would put aside hundreds of millions of dollars for water storage projects, water recycling, and desalination plants. … The bill is also sponsored by California Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein, and Colorado Republican Senator Cory Gardner.

Aquafornia news KCRA TV

Owner hopes to resurrect 300-foot ship as Isleton hot spot

The Aurora ship has been sitting vacant for years in San Joaquin County. Its owner wants to move it to Isleton’s public marina, refurbish it and open it up as a business. If it moves to Isleton’s waterfront, the ship could be used to host weddings and parties, be a bed and breakfast and provide a home for the owner’s family to run the business.

Aquafornia news Bakersfield Californian

‘Potentially harmful’ blue-green algae found in Lake Isabella, lake users should exercise caution

The Kern County Public Health Services Department recently received water samples from eight different locations in Lake Isabella, and two water samples indicated the presence of blue-green algae, or cyanobacteria, at a cautionary level. This type of algae can be considered potentially harmful.

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Aquafornia news Pasadena Star-News

Arcadia, these are your rules for using water during the summer months

The drought may be over, but Arcadia residents and businesses must restrict their irrigation and water consumption yet again this summer as the city’s mandatory water conservation program continues to push through its first of eight phases.

Aquafornia news Denver Post

Denver Water proposes to replace all lead pipes in system

Denver Water will propose the removal of lead service pipes from homes across the metro area — an action rarely seen in the United States and one that could cost roughly $500 million and take 15 years. “Cost is not an issue. Public health is the issue,” Denver Water CEO Jim Lochhead said in an interview…

Aquafornia news Marin Independent Journal

Editorial: Better reporting on sewage spills needed

While the local sewerage agencies followed state and federal law in reporting spills to governmental agencies, the public wouldn’t necessarily know much about them. In this case, it has taken Heal the Bay, a statewide environmental organization, to dig them out of bureaucracies’ files.

Aquafornia news The Fresno Bee

Opinion: California Senate Bill 1 a dangerous over-reaction

Proponents have said SB 1 will keep Trump from delivering more water to farms, thereby harming endangered fish. That sentiment is exactly what makes SB 1 so dangerous. It relies on the worn-out trope that California’s water issues boil down to “farms versus fish.”

Aquafornia news San Joaquin Valley Sun

Opinion: It’s not too late to save California’s salmon, but here’s what we need to do

If we can make things just a bit easier and provide reliable water and habitat, salmon in California can and will recover. This understanding informed the State Water Resources Control Board’s recent approval of a legally-required water management plan to reverse the ecological crisis that threatens an important coastal industry, drinking water for millions, and the natural heritage of California.

Aquafornia news Voices of Monterey Bay

Opinion: The future of Monterey County water

The Monterey County Board of Supervisors will decide July 15 if California American Water will be permitted to build its $329 million desal plant. The supervisors will be hearing appeals brought by Public Water Now and the Marina Coast Water District challenging the county Planning Commission’s decision to allow Cal Am to proceed with this seriously flawed venture. There are some major problems with the proposed plant.

Aquafornia news CALmatters

Opinion: Plastic recycling bill would amount to a new water tax

People in Paradise lost their homes and most of their town, and then came more shocking news: Paradise’s water is contaminated with benzene, which is known to cause cancer. … Now there is legislation that will likely cause an increase in the cost of bottled water at precisely a time when these communities are trying to rebuild.

Aquafornia news San Francisco Chronicle

Thursday Top of the Scroll: High-tide flooding poses big problem for US, California, federal scientists warn

The nation’s coasts were hit with increased tidal flooding over the past year, part of a costly and perilous trend that will only worsen as sea levels continue to rise, federal scientists warned Wednesday.

Related article:

Aquafornia news KQED Science

Why this Bay Area senator was the sole no vote on Newsom’s clean water plan

Bob Wieckowski was the only state senator to vote against Gov. Gavin Newsom’s plan to clean up dirty drinking water in the California’s poorest communities… To be clear, Wieckowski thinks clean water is an important priority. His quibble is that California will pay for it with revenue generated from the state’s cap-and-trade auction.

Related article:

Aquafornia news The New York Times

As fresh water grows scarcer, it could become a good investment

Water is easy to take for granted. It falls from the sky, and, though it’s vital, we sometimes treat it as if it’s worthless. How often have you seen sprinklers running in the rain? Yet the prospect of shortages in the years ahead could make water a precious commodity. That represents an opportunity for investors.

Aquafornia news Water Education Foundation

2019 Water Summit theme announced – Water Year 2020: A Year of Reckoning

Our 36th annual Water Summit, happening Oct. 30 in Sacramento, will feature the theme “Water Year 2020: A Year of Reckoning,” reflecting upcoming regulatory deadlines and efforts to improve water management and policy in the face of natural disasters.

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