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Aquafornia
Water news you need to know

A collection of top water news from around California and the West compiled each weekday by veteran journalist Matt Weiser. Send any comments to Foundation News & Publications Director Doug Beeman.

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Please Note: The headlines below are the original headlines used in the publication cited at the time they are posted here, and do not reflect the stance of the Water Education Foundation, an impartial nonprofit that remains neutral.

Aquafornia news The Fresno Bee

Friday Top of the Scroll: Small, Central Valley community finally gets clean water

For years — too many, residents say — Seville households teetered with unpredictable conditions. Using too much water in the day meant having none at night. One flush too many, and everyone relying on a single well in town was thrown into a dry spell. … The coming summer, however, promises to be a new one altogether for residents in Seville.

Aquafornia news TechRepublic

US home water use up 21% daily during COVID-19 crisis

The average US home used nearly 729 additional gallons of water in April than it did in February, according to a new study from water-monitoring company Phyn. This means usage was up 21% daily, as most Americans followed orders to work and shelter from home, in an effort to “flatten the curve” and curb the spread of the coronavirus.

Aquafornia news Bloomberg Law

Trump uses ‘emergency’ to speed up infrastructure projects

President Donald Trump signed an executive order Thursday calling on federal agencies to use emergency powers to “accelerate” infrastructure projects on federal lands as a response to the coronavirus pandemic. The order urges the Interior, Agriculture, and Defense departments to use emergency powers under the Endangered Species Act, Clean Water Act and National Environmental Policy Act to speed projects through the approval process.

Related articles:

Aquafornia news WaterWorld

Leading water associations urge EPA to expedite regulation of PFAS

The National Ground Water Association and eight of the country’s leading drinking water organizations are urging the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to move expeditiously as it evaluates drinking water standards for two per- and polyfluorinated substances (PFAS).

Related article:

Aquafornia news The Press

State of California cautions residents about early algae season

Prompted by a complaint from a Discovery Bay resident, the State Water Board issued a press release on May 22 warning residents about harmful algal blooms (HAB). The press release comes early in the season, when HAB are not normally seen. The algal blooms, a build-up of blue-green algae toxin called cyanobacteria, float on top of the water or in the water and look like green, white or brown scum.

Aquafornia news East Bay Times

Public can weigh in on Franks Tract marshland proposal at upcoming webinar

Situated between Bethel Island and False River and accessible only by boat, Franks Tract is primarily used by fishermen, boaters and waterfowl hunters. But, over the past several years, the Department of Fish and Wildlife has been studying ways to restore part of the 3,523-acre underwater state park to its original marshland in the hopes of reducing saltwater intrusion into the Delta and more.

Aquafornia news California Department of Fish and Wildlife

Blog: Saving endangered Coho salmon in Central California

Recognizing the recovery of Coho salmon in central California’s streams and rivers as a high priority, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife is collaborating with NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and other partner agencies and non-governmental organizations to develop and implement recovery actions. The tricky part is that there is no one-size-fits-all approach to saving the species.

Aquafornia news Lake County News

COVID-19 virus detected in May 12 raw sewage samples from two wastewater treatment plants

On Wednesday, Special Districts received results for samples taken on May 12, showing the presence of the virus at the Southeast Regional and Northwest Regional Plants. Officials said results have been significantly delayed as consultant Biobot has become overwhelmed with hundreds of agencies and municipalities joining their project. Results for May 19 and May 26 samples remain pending, the county reported.

Aquafornia news NetworkWorld

Startup lands $100 million to build floating data centers

Now while the idea of water cooling is hardly new, I was a little flummoxed at Nautilus’s strategy, especially since its first data center will be based in Stockton, California, a city repeatedly voted one of the worst places to live, and the Calaveras River that runs through the town is filthy. There’s a method to the madness, though.

Aquafornia news Roseville Today

Placer County Water Agency approves consolidation with Dutch Flat

The Placer County Water Agency (PCWA) Board of Directors approved an agreement allowing the Dutch Flat Mutual Water Company (Dutch Flat Mutual) to consolidate with PCWA… The agreement allows for the extension of PCWA’s distribution system into the Dutch Flat community, effectively connecting current Dutch Flat customers to PCWA’s Alta Water System.

Aquafornia news U.S. Bureau of Reclamation

News release: Reclamation announces mussel-sniffing dogs to protect New Melones Lake from invasive species

The Bureau of Reclamation will begin using mussel-sniffing dogs to inspect boats on the weekends this summer to help protect New Melones Lake from invasive-aquatic species, such as quagga or zebra mussels.

Aquafornia news The Salt Lake Tribune

Opinion: Massive Lake Powell pipeline project affects all Utahns, not just Washington County

People generally think of the Lake Powell Pipeline (LPP) as a southern Utah project, which it is. But we should not forget that the project, first conceived in 1995 and mandated by the 2006 Lake Powell Pipeline Development Act, would burden all Utahns.

Aquafornia news Western Farm Press

Thursday Top of the Scroll: State, feds in talks over water

California and federal water regulators are trying to quickly resolve their legal dispute over competing biological opinions governing the management of their respective water projects, a top state official says. The talks are proceeding after Gov. Gavin Newsom filed suit in February to nullify new federal opinions that would ease restrictions on surface water for San Joaquin Valley growers.

Aquafornia news Agri-Pulse

Water Portfolio to be finalized ‘in coming weeks’

During a meeting of the State Board of Food and Agriculture on Tuesday, Natural Resources Secretary Wade Crowfoot said the administration is continuing to advance the Water Resilience Portfolio and plans to complete the policy document soon. … The plan has stalled since the COVID-19 pandemic took hold of California.

Aquafornia news Associated Press

Epidemic of wipes and masks plague sewers, storm drains

While drain clogs aren’t new, most of the more than 15 cities contacted by The Associated Press said they’ve become a more costly and time consuming headache during the pandemic. Home-bound Americans are seeking alternatives to bathroom tissue because of occasional shortages, while stepping up efforts to sanitize their dwellings and themselves.

Aquafornia news AgNet West

Legislation seeks to address San Joaquin Valley canals

New legislation was recently introduced that will address several issues facing San Joaquin Valley canals. The Restoration of Essential Conveyance Act was introduced by Senator Dianne Feinstein as a means for repairing water conveyance damaged by subsidence.

Aquafornia news E&E News

EPA makes ‘contorted’ legal argument for permit rule

EPA’s final rule that curtails states’ authority over Clean Water Act permitting of pipelines, hydroelectric dams and other energy projects could run afoul of a 1994 Supreme Court ruling that originally granted states that oversight power.

Related article:

Aquafornia news Los Angeles Business Journal

Cadiz finds new focus

The company’s long-term goal is still to complete a project to allow the transfer of up to 1.6 billion gallons of water a year from an aquifer under its land to six Southern California water agencies. But for the short-term, Cadiz is looking toward agricultural development on its 45,000 acres of land about 30 miles northeast of Joshua Tree National Park.

Aquafornia news Woodland Daily Democrat

Garamendi introduces bill to provide federal aid to special districts

Rep. John Garamendi, D-3rd District, has introduced legislation to ensure special districts in California and throughout America are eligible for any additional federal assistance provided by Congress to state, county and local governments to assist in the fight against the coronavirus.

Aquafornia news Environmental Protection Online

Big corporations contribute to water shortages — how can they fix it?

As big corporations consume mass amounts of water, the smaller, local communities near the plants, factories and corporate offices have fewer resources. Water shortages then become prevalent as the corporation continues to use up the nearby sources. … In order to make a meaningful change for smaller communities, big corporations will need to work on alternatives.

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