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Aquafornia
Water news you need to know

A collection of top water news from around California and the West compiled each weekday by veteran journalist Matt Weiser.

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Please Note: The headlines below are the original headlines used in the publication cited at the time they are posted here, and do not reflect the stance of the Water Education Foundation, an impartial nonprofit that remains neutral.

Aquafornia news E&E News

Border wall: If people can’t get through, neither can the river

Despite being on opposite sides of the immigration debate, environmental groups who oppose border barriers generally mirror cattle rancher John Ladd’s concerns about the river. They say a wall or fence across the San Pedro could have devastating consequences to its hydrology, as well as the endangered species that call the river home.

Aquafornia news CBS Los Angeles

Most of Trona still without water Tuesday following quakes

The quakes left a majority of the town without water or natural gas service over the weekend. Pacific Gas & Electric restored gas service Monday afternoon, but water services remains out.

Aquafornia news The Conversation

At least 2% of US public water systems are like Flint’s – Americans just don’t hear about them

Water systems, especially in rural areas, can report much higher levels of lead than the EPA cutoff. In 2017, for example, an elementary school in Tulare County, California, home to agricultural laborers, reported lead levels of 4,600 ppb. The school distributed bottled water to its students and replaced its well.

Aquafornia news Voice of San Diego

Local water providers have racked up dozens of violations

Regulators have issued dozens of water-quality citations to over 100 different San Diego water providers in the past five years, according to state and county records. Most violations were issued to small districts, which can have a harder time maintaining and upgrading equipment.

Aquafornia news The Press

Legislation for removal of abandoned commercial vessels sailing forward

New legislation authored by Assemblymember Jim Frazier, D-Discovery Bay, and signed into law by Gov. Gavin Newsom, calls for the development of a plan to deal with abandoned and derelict commercial vessels in the Delta. A draft of that plan is now available for review and public comment.

Aquafornia news The Tribune

California Coastal Commission to vote on Morro Bay sewer project

A decade-long debate over how and where to build the new Morro Bay sewage treatment plant will come to head at a California Coastal Commission meeting in San Luis Obispo on Thursday. … The preferred site is located on about 15 acres of a 396-acre property at the corner of Highway 1 and South Bay Boulevard.

Aquafornia news River Scene Magazine

No Dam? No Lake! No Lake? No City!

If Robert P. McCulloch had not flown over the beautiful waters of Lake Havasu, there would never have been a Lake Havasu City. But if Parker Dam didn’t exist, there would never have been a Lake Havasu in the first place. It’s a bit like the riddle of the chicken and the egg.

Aquafornia news The San Diego Union-Tribune

Parties reach consensus on saltwater option for Buena Vista Lagoon

Property owners along the Buena Vista Lagoon, which has become more like a shallow, stagnant lake, have agreed after years of negotiations to remove the weir that keeps out the ocean.

Aquafornia news Half Moon Bay Review

Cañada Cove residents without drinkable water

Residents in the Cañada Cove neighborhood started their Independence Day holiday with some unexpected news: Water would be turned off for about 12 hours. Five days later, the water is flowing again, but they still cannot drink it.

Aquafornia news California Department of Water Resources

News release: Riverine Stewardship Program offers $48 million in competitive grants

The Department of Water Resources released the final guidelines for the Riverine Stewardship Program on July 1, 2019. The grant program supports planning and implementation of projects that restore streams, creeks, and rivers to enhance the environment for fish, wildlife, and people.

Aquafornia news Ventura County Star

Editorial: General Plan update must include water supply

It is vital for a local resilient water supply that the county acknowledge and address the limited, local resource of freshwater in the redo of the county’s General Plan.

Aquafornia news The Desert Sun

Opinion: SB 307 sets a dangerous precedent in targeting Cadiz project

The state legislative process is designed to create laws that protect and improve the life of all Californians. It is not intended to punish a single business or project. Yet, our Legislature is moving a bill, SB 307, that does just that under the guise of desert protection.

Aquafornia news California WaterBlog

Blog: Challenges and opportunities for integrating small and rural drinking water stakeholders in SGMA implementation

The Sustainable Groundwater Management Act (SGMA) is an historic opportunity to achieve long-term sustainable groundwater management and protect drinking water supplies for hundreds of small and rural low-income communities, especially in the San Joaquin Valley.

Aquafornia news Inkstain.net

Blog: How Parker Dam might have been the Colorado River’s first

If you want to dam rivers, as we were inclined across much of the 20th century, the location of the current Parker Dam on the Lower Colorado River makes sense – a narrow gap just downstream from the confluence of the Colorado and Bill Williams rivers on the Arizona-California border.

Aquafornia news San Francisco Chronicle

Tuesday Top of the Scroll: PG&E’s planned power shutdowns could choke off vital water supplies

Utilities, including several in the Bay Area, simply don’t have the backup power to replace the electricity that Pacific Gas and Electric Co. normally provides for water delivery and sewage treatment. The agencies are trying to make their operations more energy efficient and adding alternative power sources in case the cord is cut, but it may not be enough.

Aquafornia news Associated Press

Senate approves clean drinking water fund

The California Senate on Monday sent legislation to Gov. Gavin Newsom that will spend $130 million a year over the next decade to improve drinking water for about a million people. … Newsom had proposed a tax on most residential water bills to address the problem. Instead, the Senate approved a bill that would authorize spending up to $130 million each year on the state’s distressed water districts, with most of it coming from a fund aimed at fighting climate change.

Aquafornia news Voice of San Diego

The earthquake risk no one’s talking about

San Diego faces a hidden earthquake threat — to its water supply. A quake, even one so far away that nobody in San Diego feels it, could force mandatory water-use restrictions. That’s because most of San Diego’s water comes from hundreds of miles away through threads of metal and concrete that connect us to distant rivers and reservoirs.

Related articles:

Aquafornia news Bakersfield Californian

Market-based program would encourage farmers to buy, sell local groundwater

The Rosedale-Rio Bravo Water Storage District’s pilot program, set for testing later this summer or early fall, would allow certain landowners to buy or sell groundwater to or from another property owner within the district.

Related articles:

Aquafornia news Yale Environment 360

In an era of extreme weather, concerns grow over dam safety

It is a telling illustration of the precarious state of United States dams that the near-collapse in February 2017 of Oroville Dam, the nation’s tallest, occurred in California, considered one of the nation’s leading states in dam safety management.

Aquafornia news E&E News

Interior officials removed climate references from press releases

The news release hardly stood out. It focused on the methodology of the study rather than its major findings, which showed that climate change could have a withering effect on California’s economy by inundating real estate over the next few decades. An earlier draft of the news release, written by researchers, was sanitized by Trump administration officials, who removed references to the dire effects of climate change after delaying its release for several months.

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