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Overview

Aquafornia
Water news you need to know

A collection of top water news from around California and the West compiled each weekday by veteran journalist Matt Weiser.

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Please Note: The headlines below are the original headlines used in the publication cited at the time they are posted here, and do not reflect the stance of the Water Education Foundation, an impartial nonprofit that remains neutral.

Aquafornia news Grist.org

150 million trees died in California’s drought, and worse is to come

A new study, just published in Nature Geoscience, reveals an elegant formula to explain why some trees died and others didn’t — and it suggests more suffering is in store for forests as the climate heats up.

Related articles:

Aquafornia news The Hill

Trump threatens veto on defense bill that targets ‘forever chemicals’

One day after President Trump delivered a speech preaching of his administration’s environmental achievements, he threatened to veto a military spending bill in part due to provisions that aim to clean up a toxic, cancer-linked chemical found near military bases.

Aquafornia news USA Today

Global warming is killing fish, hurting sport fishing industry

Global warming is putting lake fish in hot water, with worrisome possibilities for many species, as well as the nation’s fishermen and the $115 billion sport fishing industry that employs as many as 820,000 people.

Aquafornia news The Sun-Gazette

Communities still gaming out what the future of groundwater will be

To better understand groundwater markets, attendees at the meeting played a groundwater market game, which was developed by the Environmental Defense Fund and the University of Michigan to teach players about the challenges of managing scarce groundwater resources.

Aquafornia news Las Vegas Sun

Aftershocks continue in California desert; community remains without water

The U.S. Geological Survey said the chance of a quake larger than Friday’s 7.1 temblor is less than 1% and the chance of a magnitude 6 or higher is down to 6%. … Trona, which has about 1,800 residents, lost power until Monday and remained without water on Wednesday.

Aquafornia news Monterey County Weekly

The fight over Monterey Peninsula’s water future is a debate over who gets to decide

What is at stake is the water supply for the Monterey Peninsula. Consuming water drawn from the Carmel River is no longer feasible, neither ecologically nor legally. But the power to decide on an alternative supply is largely vested in the hands of public officials from outside the region.

Aquafornia news Marin Independent Journal

Marin golf course’s threat to endangered salmon debatable

The golf course property, now earmarked by its nonprofit owner the Trust For Public Land for “rewilding” after a fierce community battle over its future, sits in the headwaters of the Lagunitas Creek watershed. The watershed … is a spawning and rearing ground for coho salmon and steelhead trout, both of which are on the endangered species list.

Aquafornia news Action News Now

Glenn Groundwater Authority approves operation fee increase for water service

On Monday the Glenn Groundwater Authority passed an operation fee increase for water service, despite meeting some opposition. Anyone within the Glenn County portion of the Colusa subbasin except for Willows and Orland will have to pay the fee. The board set the operation fee at $1.61 per acre, per year for the fiscal 2019-2020 year.

Aquafornia news Fox 26 News

Water levels at Friant Dam are at full capacity; what that means for the Central Valley

The water is coming straight from the Sierra Nevada Mountains and is very cold, which is causing some concerns people hoping to get into the water. But, the water itself, when used what it’s intended for, has a great impact in our Central Valley.

Related article:

Aquafornia news ABC7 News

How PG&E’s planned outages could affect Marin County’s water supply

High up on a hill, behind a barbed wire fence, are large steel tanks– the likes of which hold Marin County’s water supply. Gravity pulls water down pipes to supply homes in the area, but in order to refill the tanks, electricity is needed. A potential problem if PG&E decides to cut power during high fire danger conditions.

Aquafornia news The San Diego Union-Tribune

Helix pledges additional $2.5 million for Padre Dam reclaimed water plan

The $650 million project involves a joint financial partnership between Padre Dam, Helix, San Diego County and the city of El Cajon. The Helix board voted 4-1 last week to continue funding the Advanced Water Purification project, which is expected to have reclaimed water flowing into faucets by 2025.

Aquafornia news KRCR TV

EPA issues emergency order for Glenn County drinking water

The EPA ordered the Grindstone Indian Rancheria in Elk Creek to provide alternative drinking water, disinfect the system’s water and monitor the water for contamination. … The EPA said Stony Creek has numerous potential contaminants from agricultural, municipal and industrial operations.

Aquafornia news Los Angeles Times

Opinion: California moves to block Trump from rolling back its environmental protections

There’s a new twist in the California-Trump brawl in the state Legislature. It’s aimed at overriding the president’s power to weaken environmental protections. Put simply, any federal protections President Trump tried to gut would immediately become state regulations in their original, strong form.

Aquafornia news NOAA

Blog: U.S. has its wettest 12 months on record – again

Rain – and plenty of it – was the big weather story in June, adding to a record-breaking 12 months of precipitation for the contiguous U.S. It’s the third consecutive time in 2019 (April, May and June) the past 12-month precipitation record has hit an all-time high.

Aquafornia news NOAA Fisheries

Blog: California vintner steps forward to protect endangered salmon

A vintner in Northern California is upgrading a concrete fish barrier to return native salmon and steelhead to valuable spawning habitat that has been blocked for nearly a century. A cooperative “Safe Harbor” agreement between the landowner Barbara Banke, proprietor of Jackson Family Wines, and NOAA Fisheries … fostered the improvements.

Aquafornia news BBKLaw.com

Blog: Irrigation district may refuse water delivery to rule violators

An irrigation district may adopt and enforce reasonable rules related to water service, and may terminate water delivery for failure to comply with such rules, a California appellate court ruled. Although this case involved an irrigation district, the decision may also strengthen other water providers’ authority to adopt and enforce rules relating to water service.

Aquafornia news SFGate.com

Wednesday Top of the Scroll: California’s future weather will alternate between drought and atmospheric rivers, study says

Remember the parade of atmospheric-river storms that deluged the Bay Area last winter, giving us the wettest rainy season in 20 years? There are a lot more of those on the way, scientists say. But California will also experience more periods of extreme dryness, according to a new study led by Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego.

Related articles:

Aquafornia news AgAlert

Agricultural water agencies refine efficiency plans

Agricultural water suppliers must develop annual water budgets and drought plans that meet requirements of recently enacted legislation, and are meeting with state officials to comply with the updated law—a process that could ultimately affect water costs for California farmers and ranchers.

Aquafornia news The Conversation

Blog: Western states buy time with a 7-year Colorado River drought plan, but face a hotter, drier future

The plan is historic: It acknowledges that southwestern states need to make deep water use reductions – including a large share from agriculture, which uses over 70% of the supply – to prevent Colorado River reservoirs from declining to critically low levels. But it also has serious shortcomings. It runs for less than a decade. And its name suggests a response to a temporary problem.

Aquafornia news YourCentralValley.com

Friant Dam operators release water into San Joaquin River, Millerton Lake at capacity

A massive flow of fresh water is being released from Friant Dam on Tuesday as Millerton Lake reached capacity. … Officials are releasing 1,700-1,000 cubic feet per second into the San Joaquin River. Stroup said Millerton Lake has received above average snow melt forcing them to release the water to make room for more run off.

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