Development & Population

Overview

Development & Population

Aquafornia news San Francisco Chronicle

Editorial: Effect of rising seas has a time line and cost

California’s fabled beaches are shrinking, with waves and tides eventually expected to slosh over thousands of coastal homes and businesses. That’s the entirely plausible prediction from scientists studying climate change and rising ocean levels linked to hotter temperatures.

Aquafornia news Marin Independent Journal

Report: Marin rated most vulnerable to coastal flooding

Amid accelerating sea level rise from climate change, Marin County has the highest number of households in California vulnerable to coastal flooding, according to a report released Monday. In the worst case scenario, there are a possible 4,377 Marin homes at risk of being inundated with chronic flooding by 2045, the Union of Concerned Scientists reported.

Aquafornia news San Francisco Chronicle

Many coastal properties may be flooded out by 2045, climate report warns

That oceanfront property in Stinson Beach you’ve dreamed about may not be so perfect after all. A report published Monday finds that nearly 4,400 homes in Marin County might not make it beyond a 30-year mortgage because of encroaching seawater.

Aquafornia news The Sacramento Bee

They are building 11,000 new homes in Folsom. But will there be enough water?

It’s like a new city springing to life: 11,000 homes and apartments, three public schools, a pair of fire stations, a police station, a slew of office and commercial buildings and 1,000 acres of parks, trails and other open space. Expected population: 25,000. But will it have enough water?

Aquafornia news CALmatters

Swinging for the fences, California sports teams keep asking lawmakers for special deals

The proposals routinely stir up debate over California’s environmental laws and whether to grant special deals for wealthy sports franchises. … At the heart of the debate is the California Environmental Quality Act, a nearly 50-year-old law that some see as a sacrosanct protection and others as an excuse for lawsuits that drag on so long they doom ambitious projects.

Aquafornia news Marin Independent Journal

Novato soil testing, cleanup underway at possible site for townhomes

Petroleum products were stored in three steel 10,000-gallon underground storage tanks containing unleaded gasoline and a 1,000-gallon waste oil tank. The activities led to petroleum-based contaminants being released into the soil and groundwater beneath the site, according to the city.

Aquafornia news San Jose Mercury News

Martins Beach: Surfers tell Supreme Court Khosla has no case

Silicon Valley billionaire Vinod Khosla knew California’s laws when he bought property on the San Mateo County coastline 10 years ago, and he shouldn’t be allowed to block public access to the beach now, after families have visited it for nearly 100 years. That’s the core argument that surfers are making in a brief to the U.S. Supreme Court this week as part of a case that could potentially rewrite California’s laws guaranteeing public access to beaches if the Supreme Court takes up the case this fall and rules in Khosla’s favor. 

Aquafornia news Arizona Daily Star

CAP kills purchase of rural land, water rights for suburban Tucson-Phoenix growth

The agency that operates the CAP must look elsewhere for water for future suburban growth, now that it’s killed a proposed $34 million deal to buy land and water rights in rural Mohave County along the Colorado River. Officials of the Central Arizona Water Conservation District aren’t ruling out the possibility of trying to acquire water rights from Mohave or other rural areas on a shorter-term basis.

Aquafornia news San Jose Mercury News

Los Gatos’ last walnut orchard slated for demolition

The North 40 site is about to be cleared of its abundance of trees to make way for the construction of 320 homes and 66,000 square feet of commercial and retail space. … As for the trees, an arborist recently determined that 30 to 35 of them are healthy enough that they are now being offered to Los Gatos residential and commercial property owners.

Aquafornia news Los Angeles Times

From earthquake’s destruction, a new San Francisco rises three decades later

On the ground once marked by devastation, a new city is rising. The 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake battered the gritty South of Market district, damaging the Embarcadero Freeway that walled off downtown San Francisco from the bay and left city leaders with a choice: Do they repair and retrofit it, or envision something bolder?

Aquafornia news Thomson Reuters Foundation

Desert city Phoenix mulls ways to quench thirst of sprawling suburbs

Anthem follows the model of the low-density, family-friendly suburbs that have sprouted around Phoenix since the 1950s to accommodate the region’s surging population. But further rapid expansion could prove challenging at a time when water supplies are dwindling, as warming temperatures increasingly affect the western United States, scientists warn.

Aquafornia news The Fresno Bee

Judge’s ruling allows Fresno water fees for new development

A Fresno Superior Court judge ruled in favor of the city of Fresno and upheld new water fees that ensure new homes will have enough water after some of Fresno’s largest developers filed a petition against the fees.

Aquafornia news Fresno Bee

Editorial: Madera County Supervisors Premature in Approving Gunner Ranch

From The Fresno Bee:

With California — particularly its farm economy — suffering from the effects of a historic drought, it is imperative that our leaders act responsibly to protect water resources.

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Aquafornia news

Commentary: Building Again in Natomas is Too Risky

From The Sacramento Bee, in a commentary by Bruce Maiman:

Growth is returning to Natomas, but a troubling question is going to be ignored or dismissed by those with the power to address it: Is building in a floodplain a good idea?

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Aquafornia news Manteca Bulletin

Manteca Share of Levee Study: $863K

From the Manteca Bulletin:

If 200-year flood protection isn’t secured — or at least a financial and implementation plan in place by July 1, 2016 — development of the Great Wolf Resort and family entertainment zone, The Trails at Manteca, and other residential projects in southwest Manteca won’t take place.

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Aquafornia news Los Angeles Times

National Park Service Calls Development Plans a Threat to Grand Canyon

From the Los Angeles Times:

Looking eastward from the canyon’s popular South Rim, visitors could soon see a hive of construction as workers build restaurants, hotels and shops on a distant mesa on the Navajo Indian reservation. … That project and a second, unrelated development proposed for just south of the canyon have set off alarms at the National Park Service, which sees them as the most serious threat the park has faced in its 95-year history.

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Aquafornia news Los Angeles Times

California Acts to Speed Up Quake Fault Mapping

From the Los Angeles Times:

With Gov. Jerry Brown’s approval, California officials are reviving an ambitous plan to study dangerous earthquake faults and create zoning maps that could restrict development.

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Aquafornia news Los Angeles Times

Developers Seek End to Federal Protections for California Gnatcatcher

From the Los Angeles Times:

Developers citing new scientific evidence are pressing to end federal protections for the California gnatcatcher, whose status as a threatened species has barred development in many areas of prime Southern California coastal real estate for two decades.

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Aquafornia news Los Angeles Times

Developers Seek End to Federal Protections for California Gnatcatcher

From the Los Angeles Times:

Developers citing new scientific evidence are pressing to end federal protections for the California gnatcatcher, whose status as a threatened species has barred development in many areas of prime Southern California coastal real estate for two decades.

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Aquafornia news

Blog: High Population Growth Shifts from California to Other States

From The Sacramento Bee Capitol Alert blog, in a post by Dan Walters:

“California cities once led the nation in urban population growth, but sharp declines in migration and birthrates have slowed the state’s human expansion to well under 1 percent a year, a third of what was happening during the go-go 1980s.”

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