Climate change & water supply

Overview

Climate change & water supply

Aquafornia news The New York Times

Climate change is altering lakes and streams, study suggests

To scientists who study lakes and rivers, it seems humans have embarked on a huge unplanned experiment. By burning fossil fuels, we have already raised the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by 40 percent, and we’re on track to increase it by much more. Some of that gas may mix into the world’s inland waters, and recent studies hint that this may have profound effects on the species that live in them.

Aquafornia news The Livermore Independent

Project to study climate effects on California water systems from headwaters to groundwater

To address future climate change effects on water resources, scientists at five UC campuses, and Lawrence Livermore and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories will study California’s water systems, from the headwaters in the Sierra Nevada, through rivers, reservoirs and groundwater in the Central Valley. The goal is to provide information to optimize water storage, quality and groundwater sustainability.

Aquafornia news Santa Cruz Sentinel

Oil giant seeks to depose Santa Cruz city, county officials

In December, the city and county of Santa Cruz joined a wave of coastal California communities suing fossil-fuel companies for climate-change related damages. On Monday, ExxonMobil pushed back against what it called “abusive law enforcement tactics and litigation,” threatening to file its own legal action and accusing the local jurisdictions of hypocritically omitting reference to climate change damages from their own bond disclosures.

Aquafornia news NPR

Montana barley fields become front line for climate change and beer

Barley is an unforgiving crop that needs a precise recipe of water and sunshine to thrive — too much of either will cause it to wither and die.

Aquafornia news Water Deeply

Commentary: Strengthening California’s water protections to fend off D.C.

California must step up to blunt Trump’s destructive agenda on water as we have on climate change. And we have the framework in place to do so. Our State Water Resources Control Board and nine regional water boards are our bulwarks against the degradation of our coast, surface water and groundwater.

Aquafornia news Reuters

Trump’s EPA aims to replace Obama-era climate, water regulations in 2018

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will replace Obama-era carbon and clean water regulations and open up a national debate on climate change in 2018, part of a list of priorities for the year that also includes fighting lead contamination in public drinking water.

Aquafornia news Santa Fe New Mexican

UNM meteorologist says Southwest ‘on front lines … of climate change’

When the trees are bare, climate scientist and meteorologist David Gutzler has an unobscured view of the Sandia Mountains from his office window. … Gutzler, 62, has spent the last two decades teaching climatology and meteorology at UNM [The University of New Mexico] but said he never expected that his field of study, which has focused on monsoonal patterns, drought and the impacts of climate change on state water resources, would be the subject of so much controversy.

Aquafornia news The New York Times

In New York, drawing flood maps is a ‘Game of Inches’

New York will be the first major metropolis to be remapped taking into account the realities of climate change, like rising sea levels and increasingly powerful storms. … As a result, FEMA and city officials say, New York could be an example for other places around the country.

Aquafornia news E&E News

Interior Department rescinds Obama-era mitigation and climate docs

The Interior Department is dialing back more environmental goals set in the Obama administration, this time through a secretarial order. In a three-page order issued without fanfare Dec. 22, Deputy Interior Secretary David Bernhardt rescinded three Obama-era documents involving environmental mitigation and one involving climate change policy.

Aquafornia news The Sacramento Bee

Climate change is forcing conservationists to pick winners and losers. How to decide?

For trout in the rivers above Oroville Dam, survival is a slough. They have been navigating around dams in waters sullied by a century of logging, ranching and road building. Now they face streams shared with invasive species hitchhiking around the world at a pace accelerated by climate change. How’s a fish to endure?

Aquafornia news San Francisco Chronicle

Global Warming: How Hot 25 U.S. Cities Will Be in the Year 2100

From the San Francisco Chronicle:

Researchers at Climate Central have put together a handy tool which lets you see just how bad summers will get by 2100, if global warming predictions are accurate and nothing is done to stop the upward trend.

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Aquafornia news Los Angeles Times

Editorial: How California Can Best Fight Climate Change

From the Los Angeles Times:

But now comes the harder part for many Californians: In 2015, AB 32 will begin to cover companies that produce transportation fuels, including gasoline. That means oil companies will begin paying for the greenhouse gases their products emit, a cost the oil companies say they will pass on to consumers.

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Aquafornia news

Commentary: Ranchers Coming Around on Global Warming

From the San Bernardino County Sun, in a commentary by Thomas Elias:

California ranchers are now among the first interest groups to realize that like it or not, global warming can no longer be denied with any semblance of accuracy. For very gradually, ranchers are seeing the grasslands they depend upon to feed their cattle begin to shrink and convert naturally to shrub land.

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Aquafornia news Bureau of Reclamation

Video: Q&A with Acting Reclamation Commissioner Lowell Pimley — Climate Change and Drought

From the Bureau of Reclamation:

Acting Commissioner Lowell Pimley provides the second in a series of podcasts. In this question and answer session he discusses climate change and drought.

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Aquafornia news California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW)

News Release: CDFW to Host Third Installment of Speaker Series at Nimbus Hatchery

From the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW):

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) is hosting its third speaker series with a presentation on the effects of climate change on salmon and steelhead trout in the American River. The event will be held at the Nimbus Hatchery Visitor Center in Rancho Cordova on July 17 at 7 p.m.

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Aquafornia news Sacramento Bee

California Rice Farmers Could Get Pollution Credit

From The Sacramento Bee:

California’s evolving cap-and-trade market may soon have a new player: rice farmers. …

The program, called the Rice Cultivation Projects Compliance Offset Protocol, is slated to go into effect on Jan. 1, 2015, and run for a 10-year period.

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Aquafornia news New York Times

Second Try Puts Carbon Observatory Into Orbit

From The New York Times:

NASA’s new spacecraft to sniff carbon dioxide in the earth’s atmosphere reached orbit on Wednesday after launching from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.

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Aquafornia news

Blog: Climate Change a Risky Business for America’s Agriculture

From the Environmental Defense Fund EDF Voices: People on the Planet blog, in a post by Rebecca Shaw:

Nobody escapes climate change, especially not farmers. The report released this week by a group of prominent and politically diverse business leaders and public officials stood out, in part, because of the alarming losses it forecasts for America’s agricultural industry.

Aquafornia news New York Times

A Sunken Kingdom Re-emerges

From The New York Times:

Scanning the army of ghostly spikes protruding from the sand here one [Borth, Wales] recent morning, Dr.
Aquafornia news Associated Press

Money Men Tally Cost of Climate Change

From the Associated Press:

Climate change is likely to exact enormous costs on U.S. regional economies in the form of lost property, reduced industrial output and more deaths, according to a report backed by a trio of men with vast business experience.

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